U.S. won't take a lead role in latest Ebola response

Health authorities in several African nations are scrambling to control an Ebola epidemic in the Democratic Republic of Congo, conscious of the failures of 2014 when the disease killed eleven thousand people before it was brought under control. In the latest outbreak there are just thirty-five confirmed cases, of whom twelve have died.

As Zika invades the US, Congress dithers

Despite warnings about a Zika virus epidemic, Congress has refused to break into its summer recess and appropriate $33 million needed by the end of this month. Money is running out for developing a possible vaccine, as a disease that causes birth defects is beginning to spread.

Listen to the episode HERE.

BUG OUT - An interview with Laurie Garrett

Modern medicine is a marvel. But one of its most marvelous creations — antibiotic drugs — may prove to be as big a risk as it has been an aid to human survival. Laurie Garrett, a Pulitzer-Prize-winning journalist, has been chronicling the dangers that antibiotic overuse, especially within the livestock industry, poses to global health. Here, she explains why everyone should be afraid of a coming medical Dark Ages, and how they might arrive without any explosive pandemics.

Listen HERE

As Zika invades the US, Congress dithers

Laurie Garrett and others appear on KCRW's "To the Point" to discuss that despite warnings about a Zika virus epidemic, Congress has refused to break into its summer recess and appropriate $33 million needed by the end of this month. Money is running out for developing a possible vaccine, as a disease that causes birth defects is beginning to spread.

Listen to the full episode on KCRW. August 2016. 

Forecasting the Future of Pandemics…in 1994

 In December of 1994, two public health experts took to SciFri’s airwaves to address some disturbing trends in global public health: rising antibiotic resistance, overlooked and underfunded public health infrastructure, and a frightening resurgence of old diseases we thought we’d beat. The guests were Laurie Garrett, then a health and science writer for Newsday and author of the book The Coming Plague(and now senior fellow for health at the Council on Foreign Relations), and Stephen Ostroff, then the associate director of epidemiological sciences at the CDC (and now former acting commissioner of the FDA).

Listen to the episode HERE.

New Concerns About Fighting Malaria

A new study has detected a resistant strain of malaria in Myanmar near the Indian border, raising concerns that resistance could soon extend its hold to sub-Saharan Africa, where more than 90 percent of malaria deaths occur. Laurie Garrett appeared on The Diane Rehm Show on February 23, 2015 to discuss new concerns about combating malaria worldwide.

Full audio available here.

Measles Starts a Comeback…at Disneyland

Fifteen years after measles was declared eradicated in the United States, more than 70 people have come down with the disease — an outbreak that started at Disneyland. Laurie Garrett appears on a panel on KCRW's To The Point with host Warren Olney on January 23, 2015 to discuss how this outbreak started and what it indicates about vaccination rates.

 

Ebola epidemic continues

Although some in Liberia are now referring to Ebola in the past-tense, the epidemic looks likely to continue past its ninth month. Laurie Garrett just returned from Sierra Leone and Liberia, and she appears on WBEZ's Worldview on November 25, 2014 to give an update on what the epidemic looks like now.

The Race to Contain, Rather Than Cure, Ebola

This week Thomas Eric Duncan, the first person diagnosed with Ebola in the United States, passed away. A Dallas-area hospital initially turned him away, and his death has raised questions about what might have happened if he had been diagnosed and admitted to the hospital sooner. As healthcare workers are forced to wait for symptoms of Ebola to materialize before they can treat patients, Laurie Garrett argues on Science Friday on October 10, 2014 that rapid diagnostic testing tools could be a game changer in this ongoing outbreak.

What America Must Do To Stop Ebola, Now

Ebola reports every day now, from West Africa and well beyond. The Spanish nurse in trouble. An American cameraman being treated in Nebraska. The first case that walked into an American hospital, Thomas Duncan, dead today, in that hospital in Dallas. Is America ready for Ebola? The CDC says we'll stop it in its tracks. But 80 percent of American nurses surveyed last week said their hospitals have not taught them about it. Laurie Garrett joins Tom Ashbrook on WBUR's On Point on October 8, 2014, to discuss these issues.

As Ebola Reaches U.S. Shores, Will the Virus Spread Across America?

On September 30, the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) announced that Ebola has reached the shores of the United States. A Liberian man who traveled from his home country to visit relatives in Dallas, Texas late last month has been diagnosed with the deadly virus. On The Takeaway with John Hockenberry on October 1, 2014, Laurie Garrett explains how likely the virus is to spread, and how the CDC and the WHO are handling the outbreak.